The origin of “Banh Cuon” is traced back from Northern Vietnam, no matter the exact date and time “Banh Cuon” was initially made, people seem not to deny that “Banh Cuon” has been made for years and served over and over. “Banh Cuon” is classified under wrap and rolls dishes in Vietnamese cuisine as a dedication to it nature and the name itself.

“Banh cuon” is classified under wrap and rolls dishes in Vietnamese cuisine as a dedication to it nature and the name itself. The dish features a thin and delicate steamed rice sheet fills with a variety of filing then rolls it up. Visibly, a roll of “banh cuon” is finished from two main ingredients, steamed rice sheets and fillings. Rice sheets are made from the mixed batter of rice flours, tapioca starch and sometimes potato starch. Traditionally, makers grind white rice to have fresh rice flour in mixing with other ingredients. Only a small batch of rice is grinded each time to make enough rolls for consuming in a day. That tradition ensures no leftover rice flour is being used for the next batch to keep every roll is freshly steamed. While packed rice flour is now available at most markets, many questions raise regarding the hidden reason people still proceed with time consuming process. In the South of Vietnam, a popular roll is “banh cuon” with ground pork stuffing. It serves with Cha lua, bean sprouts, julienne Vietnamese basil and cucumber, fry shallots and mixed fish sauce. This is available in the market while “banh cuon” with filling is ordered in many restaurants.

Rolled Rive Pancake